Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
Strappado 2. The Chamber by dashinvaine Strappado 2. The Chamber by dashinvaine
The Torture chamber of the Toulouse Inquisition. c. AD1245. The last chance to confess...
Add a Comment:
 
:iconnualatawse:
NualaTawse Featured By Owner Jun 9, 2015
Fantastic :-)
Reply
:iconhamilton120712:
hamilton120712 Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2014
Very erotic.  Such delicate, tender, innocent flesh, pure and chaste until the good priests get their hands on her.  For such young lovelies, the Inquisition was merely a pretext for these evil men to violate flesh yet untouched.  Oh what luck?  This is a winner.
Reply
:iconderickthehammer:
derickthehammer Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2014
great detail, enjoy the sweet sugar plum nudity thanks!
Reply
:iconjennamax:
jennamax Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2013
What is this a sequel to? The link doesn't work
Reply
:iconcobra3844:
Cobra3844 Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2012
OK,is anice art.
Reply
:iconvader999:
Vader999 Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2012
The funny thing is if she wound up in a secular court they would have lopped her arms off.
Reply
:icongebieterxanthias:
GebieterXanthias Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2011  Student Writer
Awesome and enticing drawing.
Reply
:iconvoidqueenelishiva:
VoidQueenElishiva Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2011  Professional General Artist
I just saw a movie called Goya's Paintings about a woman tortured and held prisoner during the Inquisition. She was interrogated for being a Jew because someone witnessed her refuse pork, which she simply didn't like the taste of. During her imprisonment, one of the monks raped her. That's what this reminds me of, in fact I thought that maybe the movie might have inspired it. Very sad movie, very good artwork. Great job.
Reply
:iconvader999:
Vader999 Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2012
Lemme guess....it stars Natalie Portman.
Reply
:iconvoidqueenelishiva:
VoidQueenElishiva Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2012  Professional General Artist
Yes.
Reply
:iconnellyisamurdertramp:
NellyIsAmurderTramp Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2010
i love the shades
Reply
:iconkjkj2:
kjkj2 Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2009
good work ;)
Reply
:iconsquirrelmobster:
squirrelmobster Featured By Owner May 16, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Gut wrenchingly powerful piece you have there.
Reply
:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner May 17, 2008
So rry about that if I wrenched your guts...
Reply
:iconsquirrelmobster:
squirrelmobster Featured By Owner May 17, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I think that is a good thing (I wasn't actually ill or anything like that). It means that your art is capable of evoking powerful emotions from people. Great job.
Reply
:icongingado:
gingado Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2007
Excellent work!
Reply
:icontouch-not-this-cat:
Touch-Not-This-Cat Featured By Owner Jun 9, 2007
You realize that this feeds into Jack Chick fundimentalisms hands?

[link]

68 MILLION!?!?!

[link]

And now he claims The Vatican supported Hitler?!?!?

[link]

[link]

[link]

The Spanish Inquisition was a state-run affair, where the Church’s role was to act as a brake of responsibility, fairness, and justice on the royal court’s ferreting out of quislings (who were defined, after centuries of war against the Muslims, as those who were not sincere and orthodox Catholics). Recent scholarship, which has actually examined the meticulous records kept by the Spanish Inquisition, has proven—to take the title of a BBC documentary on the subject—"The Myth of the Spanish Inquisition." We now know, beyond all doubt, that the Monty Python sketch of inquisitors holding an old lady in "the comfy chair" while they tickle her with feather dusters is closer to the truth than images of people impaled within iron maidens. (One of the standard works of scholarship is Henry Kamen’s The Spanish Inquisition: A Historical Revision, Yale University Press.) In the course of an average year, the number of executions ordered by the Spanish Inquisition—which covered not only Spain but its vast overseas empire—was less than the number of people put to death annually by the state of Texas. And this at a time when heresy was universally considered a capital crime in Europe. The myth of the Spanish Inquisition comes from forged documents, propagandizing Protestant polemicists, and anti-Spanish Catholics, who were numerous. The fact is, far from being the bloodthirsty tribunals of myth, the courts of the Spanish Inquisition were probably the fairest, most lenient, and most progressive in Europe.

[link]

And most important of all:

Spain was under attack by, believe it or not, Turkish Muslims set on their own jihad – as it turns out the Iberian Peninsula was also infringing on Muslim Holy Ground. False conversions to Christianity to avoid suspicion were common – producing converts who would later clandestinely aid their invading cohorts. The uprooting of these bogus conversions in an attempt to halt the invading Turks was the initial aim of the Spanish Inquisition.

[link]

The Jews who were hurt were basicly bystandards who got in the way, but I would not call them entierly innocent, however. Jews sometimes falsly converted in order to aquire political powers that honest Jews had a hard time getting, (The Merchant of Venice, comes to mind). It was also important to protect the Eucharist from being partaken of unworthily. Unfoutunatly, in some investigations, more false-christan Jews were found, by chance, then false-christan Muslims. I think this cruel irony led to the current, sad notion that the focus of the Inquisition was on Jews for being Jews, rather then on Muslims for being invaders.

All that said, is it possible that something as dispicable as your depiction happend once or twice? I have to say yes; The Allies fought the good fight durring WWII, but ocasional incidents of 'Actions Unbecoming A Solider" were inevetiable (rape, torture, ect.). Or to Quote the Ball and the Cross:

I know that noble orders have bad knights,
that good knights have bad tempers, that the Church has rough priests
and coarse cardinals; I have known it ever since I was born.

You seem to have done the Church much justice in much of your art. Please continue to do so. God Bless you.
Reply
:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2007
I saw you are familiar with GK Chesterton. I subscribe to his view, anf that of Hilaire Belloc, that 'when one remembers how the Catholic Church has been governed, and by whom, one realises that it must have been divinely inspired to have survived at all.' Not a fan of Chick, though, and am aware of his poisonous claims.

This by the way, is not a scene of the Spanish Inquisition but the medieval Toulouse Inquisition, which appeared in the 1230s, and within the decade had papal authorization for the use of torture. Its primary victims were suspected Cathars. It was quite ruthless, and sometimes downright sadistc. It was not a state run thing, but under papal authority, staffed mainly by the Friars of the Dominican Order. It was imposed on the languedoc after the peace treaty of Paris, as a punitive measure. It was at that stage an arm of ecclesiastical power. Only later did the French Inquisition become primarily a agency of crown, as it was by the time of the trial of the Templars.
The Spanish Inquisition came later and was bad enough, mainly concerned with rooting out those of moorish and jewish descent who had secretly preserved their original faiths. (By the 1490s and the reign of Ferdinand and Isabella the last Muslim territory had been defeated and the Jews and Muslims had all been forced to convert to Catholicism or to leave Spain). The idea of an invasion threat from Turkey to Spain is unrealistic, especially after Lepanto. Venice and the Balkans might have had jitters about such a thing, but Spain? Regarding Turkey, the Inquisition's activities did nothing to combat any imagined threat. All the Spanish Inquisition did was endow the Ottoman Empire with the expertise and resources brought by refugee Spanish Jews, and thus if anything make the Sultan more powerful! The Muslim threat to Spain historically came from North Africa, not Turkey, and this was well neutralized before the Inquisition came along.

Some historians indulge in revisionism just so they seem to have something new to say, and just to be awkward. Tyerman also plays-down the Inquisition, I've noticed. The very concept, though, of one's religious choice being treat as a crime and of a repressive institution trying to police belief, secure submission and enforce doctrine is what outrages the modern mind. It would also have outraged the early Christians. Faith has to be a matter of choice and conviction, not an imposition backed by the mechanisms of terror. The system gave the inquisitors life-or-death power over their 'suspects' and was wide open to abuse. Like the secret police forces of Stalin's Russia and Hitler's Germany it also depended on denunciation from informers, so was often used by malicious neighbours to settle scores, or to gain their share of confiscated property. Hardly very Christian. The Christian response to this dark period of the Church's history, I feel, should be to decry and repudiate it, rather than to attempt to excuse it or play it down.
Reply
:icontouch-not-this-cat:
Touch-Not-This-Cat Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2007
Now I never said it was the most strategically brilliant Idea anyone ever came up with. As for the Jews, I believe that this has always been in effect:

[link]

In fact, abuse of the Jews in Spain was apparently coaxed by more secular authorities who were the most determined to get around this Encyclical, a manner of rationalizing that was pioneered by Spanish elitists, who took it to the extreme later to justify slavery against Church teaching!

As for the Dominicans, well, maybe they were obsolete earlier then I thought.
Reply
:iconadf-fuensalida:
ADF-Fuensalida Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2007
That is beautifully done XD
Reply
:iconadraste:
adraste Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2007
incredible; you seem like someone who is still developing a huge talent, i can barely imagine the stuff u will be doing in 5 years. exemplary, keep it up.
Reply
:iconlady-mephista:
lady-mephista Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2007  Hobbyist Photographer
i really like this draw so...no words to describe
Reply
:iconaboshi:
Aboshi Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2007  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Beautiful shot :heart: I love the story of inquisition, though it often gets much overcolored, and the poor gal presents one of those who had the bad luck of actually falling into the doom it brought to some.

The mood is great, I'm amazed with your skills, shadows, background and perspective - and also cosmically jealous of them all! The only thing that bothers me are the girl's hands, but it's a minor thing compared to the rest:)
Reply
:iconelvenstarart:
ElvenstarArt Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Wow, very nicely done! The detail is great, and the rat really adds to the dark feel. :)
Reply
:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2007
Many thanks. Good to get comments from one so good!
Reply
:iconlarkin-art:
larkin-art Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
eerily erotic (especially given the context) :eyepopping:very well drawn too
Reply
:iconthose-lovely-eyes:
those-lovely-eyes Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2007
pretty cool! you're really good at backgrounds
Reply
:iconfaile35:
faile35 Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2007   Traditional Artist
She's got a nice figure, and the costuming and mood are great! I like the stones, both in texture and value and the curved, fish-eye perspective. =)
Reply
:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2007
Thanks. I like this one better than the first.
Reply
:iconfaile35:
faile35 Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2007   Traditional Artist
You're welcome. =)
Reply
:iconfluffydeath:
FluffyDeath Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2007
*drool*... lurve it! :+fav:
Reply
:iconazurelacroix:
azurelacroix Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2007  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah, then they burn you anyway.
Reply
:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2007
True. Very low re-offending rate.
Reply
:iconflan13:
Flan13 Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2007  Professional Writer
I read medieval history and archaeology so this is brilliant. The Toulouse inquisition was horrific enough for it to be 'great,' and this shows just how 'great' it really was.

I'm impressed.
Reply
:iconpink12:
Pink12 Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
i didnt fave it for the reason you mioght think. i love it i think it is wickedly awesome
Reply
:iconnanethiel:
Nanethiel Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2007
amazing work
Reply
:iconlyvvie:
lyvvie Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2007
Oh very good. Very dark..but very good. The buildings are fantastic.
Reply
:iconellygator:
Ellygator Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2007  Hobbyist General Artist
Chilling and powerful!
Reply
:iconvanessavalkyria:
VanessaValkyria Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2007  Professional Photographer
mon dieu! :p

Itīs fantastic!!!
Reply
:iconcorsico:
Corsico Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2007  Hobbyist General Artist
fantastic work...
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×




Details

Submitted on
January 21, 2007
Image Size
779 KB
Resolution
1320×1860
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
32,876 (3 today)
Favourites
302 (who?)
Comments
40
Downloads
5,170
×